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  9. #259
    Banned
    23.10.2011
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    I have seen several patients who came to my medical clinic with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, on anti-psychotic medications like Risperdal. Upon further testing, their Western Blots returned positive for exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease. They were given doxycycline (a similar tetracycline antibiotic), and their psychotic symptoms and cognition improved significantly. Working with their psychiatrist, we were able to reduce, and in some cases eliminate, all of their antipsychotic medication. They remained clinically stable as long as they remained on antibiotics. Their psychiatric symptoms returned once they were no longer being treated for Lyme and associated tick-borne disorders, as these organisms have been shown to be able to establish a persistent infection in the body.

    Lyme disease is a major cause of psychiatric symptoms. Psychiatric case reports, as reported by psychiatrist Dr Brian Fallon, have linked Lyme disease to paranoia, thought disorders, delusions with psychosis, schizophrenia, with or without visual, auditory or olfactory hallucinations, depression, panic attacks and anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, anorexia, mood lability with violent outbursts, mania, personality changes, catatonia and dementia. Other psychiatric disorders in adults due to Lyme disease include atypical bipolar disorder, depersonalization/derealization, conversion disorders, somatization disorders, atypical psychoses, schizoaffective disorder and intermittent explosive disorders. In children and adolescents, Lyme disease can also mimic Specific or Pervasive Developmental Delays, Attention-Deficit Disorder (Inattentive subtype), oppositional defiant disorder and mood disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), anorexia, Tourettes syndrome, and pseudo-psychotic disorders. The take home message: Lyme is the great imitator. Dont exclude Lyme disease and associated infections as a possible underlying cause of psychiatric symptoms, and dont assume that a positive response to an antibiotic like minocycline is not treating an underlying infection.

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl...-schizophrenia
    Clear; 07.09.2018 19:28.
       

  10. #260

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